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3 Ways to Motivate Handwriting Practice - plus tips for special needs and a review {undergodsmightyhand.com}

3 Ways to Motivate Handwriting Practice

My son has special needs and seems to understand that he has difficulty with prewriting and handwriting skills. He can actually complete many activities his occupational therapist and I give him, but motivating him to practice for any length of time takes some creativity.

Here are three ways we’ve found to increase interest.

3 Ways to Motivate Handwriting Practice - plus tips for special needs and a review {undergodsmightyhand.com}

3 Ways to Increase Interest in Handwriting Practice

  1. Provide scaffolding. Offer a few ways to guide handwriting practice rather than just copying. You can draw the shape or letter first, then have your child go over your marking with a highlighter or marker. You can also draw bubble letters to provide a “box” for your child to write within. (See this post at I Can Teach My Child for other scaffolding ideas.)
  2. Integrate sensory options. My son is a sensory seeker and needs almost constant deep sensory input. Having your child draw (with a finger or with an implement) in sand, shaving cream, oobleck, etc. can increase interest. You can even write the letters/shapes on fine sandpaper or another textured surface and allow your child to trace it with a finger. The caution here: Sometimes the sensory method becomes too enticing and he can’t focus on writing! We have to balance this, which is really just trial-and-error so far for us.
  3. Use specific tools to change the writing surface. Through tablets, we have access to so many amazing writing and prewriting apps. My son loves several of those and thrives using them. However, he also knows what else sits on an iPad desktop (more games!), and that can be a bit distracting for him at times.

We were recently introduced to the Boogie Board LCD eWriter.

Review of the Boogie Board eWriter, plus tips for increasing interest in handwriting practice

This tablet-sized device is solely an LCD screen with a stylus. It’s easy to hold, thinner than most tablets, and feels very smooth to write on. You easily jot any note down, then erase it with a simple push of the button at the top of the device.

Most importantly for our situation: my son loves writing on this device.

How We Use the Boogie Board LCD eWriter for Handwriting Practice

  • Tracing – I write the letter or shape first, then my son traces over it. (My youngest practices, too!)
    Review of the Boogie Board eWriter, plus tips for increasing interest in handwriting practice
  • Copying – I first draw a model of the letter or shape, then my son draws one beside my model.
  • Connect-the-dots – I draw a simple connect-the-dot image, number the dots, then my son does the connecting—and practices different line directions at the same time!
  • Smiley faces – My son’s occupational therapist helped him draw a smiley face (“circle, dot, dot, smile”) with arms and legs and a simple body. She first drew with him using hand-over-hand assistance, then had him complete certain parts on his own in subsequent trials.
  • Mazes – I create simple mazes that change direction, add curves, and more. So far, he loves these the most out of any other writing exercises.

Review of the Boogie Board eWriter, plus tips for increasing interest in handwriting practice

We generally just practice for 5-15 minutes each time. I’m aiming for 3 times a week or more with this device right now. We also allow him to have freewriting time before and after each mini-session. He mainly just scribbles (and erases repeatedly), but he allows us to position the stylus correctly, so he’s still getting practice controlling a writing implement!

Review of the Boogie Board eWriter, plus tips for increasing interest in handwriting practice

A few considerations:

It’s marketed as an environmentally friendly-alternative to taking notes on paper, but with just an 8.5-inch screen and no way to save the notes, I’m not sure how practical it is for general/daily adult use. However, as evidenced above, this device has great potential for special needs populations, schools, and therapists. My son’s occupational therapist says she could see many therapists using this as an alternative to a tablet device. My husband (a public school teacher) says he’d love a class set of these to use for group work, silent class-wide answers, and in-class practice. (Although he did say they’d need to be twice the size and half the price.)

For us, this device offers enough screen-like input to interest my son to write, but without the extra distractions of a tablet. We’re glad to have it for handwriting practice!

We’re going to use this device during December when we use our Grapevine Studies packet for study on the Christmas story. We love the “Birth of Jesus” traceables for our preschoolers, and we can use the Boogie Board to motivate my son to do the tracing and perhaps even freehand drawing of the story figures. (This particular study from Grapevine is 20% off from now until December 15th!)

How do you motivate your beginning writer or child with special needs to practice handwriting?

Disclosure: I was provided a free copy of the Boogie Board LCD eWriter from Stone’s Education in exchange for my honest review. All opinions expressed are my own, and I only share what I believe to be helpful or useful.

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I am an affiliate for Grapevine Studies. If you click on a Grapevine Studies link and then make a purchase, I receive a small commission. This does not affect your final cost at all. Thank you for supporting this blog and my family!

This post is also linked up with The Homeschool Village’s Ultimate Homeschool Link-UpHomeschool Creation’s Preschool and Kindergarten Corner, In Lieu of Preschool’s Tuesday Tots, UpsideDown Homeschooling’s Hearts for Home linkup, and the Weekly Kids Co-op, Show and Share Saturday, and .


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Grapevine Studies New Testament Overview Part 1 Traceables - Review and Giveaway at Under God's Mighty Hand {Giveaway is open through 9/8/2013}

Review and Giveaway of Grapevine Studies

(Disclosure: I received a free copy of the teacher and student handbooks for The New Testament Overview Traceables from Grapevine Studies in exchange for my honest review. All opinions expressed are my own. Affiliate links are present. Thank you for supporting this site!)

When you have young kids, how do you help them really learn the Bible? We’ve read to our children since they were born, and we’ve prayed with them at meals before they could say “amen.” But, how do you help young children begin to build that solid foundation of what real faith is?

I’ve read about Grapevine Studies for nearly two years now, and I’ve held it in my mind to try as soon as my kids were old enough. I then had the opportunity to meet Dianna at Grapevine Studies at the 2:1 Conference last April. Knowing most of the reviews I had read previously mentioned the studies being geared towards 5 years old and up, I chanced asking Dianna if they offered any studies for preschoolers.

Grapevine relatively recently began offering Grapevine Studies Traceables! These studies cover similar material to the beginner level studies, but with traceable stick figure images. When the opportunity arose to review a Traceable study, I jumped at it!

Grapevine Studies New Testament Overview Part 1 Traceables - Review and Giveaway at Under God's Mighty Hand {Giveaway is open through 9/8/2013}

What is Grapevine Studies?

If you haven’t heard of them yet, Grapevines Studies aims to provide Scripture-focused Bible study combined with the tactile component of drawing stick figures to aid in memorization and understanding.

They offer numerous studies, and each study focuses on a time period, a section of the Bible, or a person. Each lesson of the Beginner and Traceable levels looks at three or four small sections of Scripture (2-4 verses each section) with a stick figure drawing to illustrate each one. The lessons then end with 4-6 review questions and a memory verse.

The New Testament Overview (which we reviewed) has a section review halfway through the curriculum with more questions and 10 lessons total. They recommend using a whiteboard to draw the stick figures as a model for your kids. We had a MagnaDoodle handy, so we used that instead of the whiteboard.

Grapevine Studies Traceables Review and Giveaway via Under God's Mighty Hand

See sample lessons of all the levels offered here.

How We Modified Grapevine Studies for Special Needs

My oldest preschooler has multiple special needs, including a severe expressive speech delay (he uses sign language) and minor delays in all other developmental areas. The New Testament Overview was the perfect place for us to start since he’s extremely fascinated with “baby Jesus” right now.

I love that each lesson uses Scripture as the reading text and pinpoints verses to focus on so as not to overwhelm preschoolers with too much information at once.

Our Schedule

We aim to read from the kids’ Bible everyday. Grapevine Studies allows us to continue using whatever Bible we choose, but focuses and reinforces our learning.

We currently aim to read two lessons a week from Grapevine Studies and review those lessons on the day(s) in between. Due to the nature of my son’s special needs, repeating and reviewing material helps him immensely.

Review Questions

Because my son can’t talk, I needed to simplify the review questions. For example, in Lesson 2, I asked my son, “What did the angel tell Mary?” and he would respond “baby Jesus” meaning that the angel told Mary she was going to have baby Jesus. Some of the review questions are above my son’s currently capacity for understanding, so I replaced some questions with simpler ones. A few examples:

I would ask: “What does an angel do?”
His response (in sign language): “angel help God”

I would ask: “What does a shepherd do?”
His response (in sign): “farmer sheep”

I would ask: “What do the shepherds tell others after they meet Jesus?”
His response (in sign): “Thank you God” (to signify that they praise God)

Even those some of our modifications were simpler, these questions help him practice expressing his recalled memories.

Drawing

My son doesn’t draw or write like most kids his age, but we’ve amped up some prewriting activities, and he’s making progress! These traceables add motivation for him to practice more.

Grapevine Studies Traceables Review and Giveaway via Under God's Mighty Hand

I don’t harp on quality as much yet, but instead focus on effort. I helped with hand-over-hand modeling early on, then he tried tracing more on his own.

Grapevine Studies Traceables Review and Giveaway via Under God's Mighty Hand

When he attempts to draw a circle for the person’s head, I get excited with him. When he draws lines straight down for the body and legs, he’s getting the right idea. Small steps lead to big progress!

Grapevine Studies Traceables Review and Giveaway via Under God's Mighty Hand

The littlest even got in on the tracing action some. :-)

Sequencing

My son is working on the concept of sequencing, so I modified our review of each Grapevine lesson to incorporate sequencing.

I printed out the lesson pages from the teacher’s handbook. Then, I cut out the stick figure picture and pasted it on one side of an index card. On the other side, I pasted the teacher’s handbook notes for that particular part of the lesson. The front side with the picture acts as a piece of a sequence, and the teacher’s notes are now easily available for me to look over.

Grapevine Studies Traceables Review and Giveaway via Under God's Mighty Hand

After we review a lesson together through rereading and retelling, I pull out these sequencing cards and ask my son to order the three or four pictures into the sequence we read in the Bible. I’ll be honest: this skill is still difficult for my son, but more practice leads to better understanding, and he’s already shown progress here, too. I give him the opportunity to try sequencing the cards on his own first, then I offer verbal cues if needed. If he’s still struggling, I have him focus on just two cards and either “retell” the story to me, or tell me which came first.

Grapevine Studies Traceables Review and Giveaway via Under God's Mighty Hand

Scripture Memory

I love that these studies include memory verses for each lesson. We’re working to memorize about one verse a month for my son, and I have to simplify verses since he signs them, but Grapevine’s memory verses help pinpoint some good ones.

An example of our simplification:

The memory verse for Lesson 1 is Luke 1:63, which reads: He asked for a writing tablet, and to everyone’s astonishment he wrote, ‘His name is John.’”

We have to simplify this to: “His name is John,” which my son can sign.

Renewing

Just like we need renewing in our hearts and minds to hold to His truths, helping my children review and renew Scripture aids in using strong bricks for a sturdy foundation. My son has enjoyed Grapevine Studies so much, he pulls the papers down from the shelf on his own during the day and spreads them all out in a semicircle around him, pointing and babbling about each one, signing “angel, God, baby Jesus, thank you” as he goes.

Grapevine Studies Traceables Review and Giveaway via Under God's Mighty Hand

Grapevine Studies Traceables Review and Giveaway via Under God's Mighty Hand

Interested in Grapevine Studies? See tips on where to start here. See frequently asked questions about the studies here.

A Giveaway!

Grapevine Studies New Testament Overview Part 1 Traceables - Review and Giveaway at Under God's Mighty Hand Grapevine Studies is offering one copy of the New Testament Overview Part 1 Traceables (for ages 3-5) student handbook and teacher handbook to one of you! (Side note: Their customer service and response is fantastic! That’s totally my opinion and my initiative to say so.) Enter this giveaway through the Rafflecopter widget below.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Terms of giveaway: This giveaway is open to US residents only and will end at the end of the day (EDT) September 8, 2013. All entrants must be 18 years old or older. Enter through the Rafflecopter widget above. Incomplete entries will be deleted. Once a winner is selected, I will contact them via email. If the winner does not respond within 72 hours, I will select another winner.

Don’t want to wait until the giveaway is over to purchase a study? Grapevine is offering a coupon code special for my readers! Enter the code “UGMH” at checkout for 20% off any item not already on sale. How awesome! (This code is valid through September 30, 2013.) Click here to visit the Grapevine Studies store.

What are you and your family currently studying in the Bible? Which Grapevine course looks most useful to you right now?

This post is also linked up with The Homeschool Village’s Ultimate Homeschool Link-UpHomeschool Creation’s Preschool and Kindergarten CornerHearts for Home linkupTender Moments with Toddlers and Preschoolers, and Free Homeschool Deals’ Ultimate Pinterest Party.

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Well-Planned Day homeschool planner - a review and giveaway! This giveaway is open through August 25, 2013.

Review and Giveaway: The Well-Planned Day Planner from HEDUA

A few weeks ago, I shared 5 tips I’m currently learning about planning homeschool activities with a child with special needs.

One big resource that helps with planning is… well, a planner!

I’ve long been a planner girl, both as a student and when I was a teacher. I love (maybe need?) recording to-dos and ideas… and then checking them off when completed.

I’m currently torn between keeping digital-only lesson plans and/or writing my plans out on paper. I like having the digital copies for ease of copying and pasting website addresses for activities, as a reference in few months and years, and for a backup. But, I like the ease of having a pencil and paper in front of me, too. Due to the nature of our current development, I tweak our plans often, so I currently need to write them all in something that can be modified.

Well-Planned Day homeschool planner - a review and giveaway! This giveaway is open through August 25, 2013.

The Well-Planned Day Planner

I met some of the extremely helpful folks with Home Educating Family Association (HEDUA) at the 2:1 Conference last April and came upon the opportunity to review one of their planners, The Well-Planned Day, a physical planner.

(Disclosure: I received a free copy of this planner in exchange for my honest review. All opinions expressed are my own. Affiliate links are also present in this post. If you purchase HEDUA products from one of these links, I receive a small commission without affecting your cost. Thank you for supporting this site and my family!)

This planner aims to provide a comprehensive product for homeschooling families. It includes:

  • Family memories sheets,
  • Contact lists,
  • Budgeting forms,
  • Cleaning/household management forms,
  • Responsibility/chore charts for kids,
  • Teacher and student schedules (for up to 4 kids),
  • Attendance reports,
  • Monthly calendars,
  • Weekly planning sheets with quotes, Scripture, and meal plan space,
  • Tear-out grocery lists,
  • Monthly encouragement articles for faith, family, and homeschool,
  • and fancy, cardstock report cards!
A review and giveaway of the Well-Planned Day planner

Left to right: monthly planning, encouragement articles, attendance sheets, and report cards

My favorite components:

  • The semester goals sheets. I love having a spot to write out goals for the semester for each of my kids and their specific needs. For my child with special needs, I discussed goals with his therapists and refined goals to focus our activities. I plan to keep this practice up throughout the years!
  • Monthly Book Lists and Field Trips pages. Including a planning page to list books read as a family (or individually) and field trips each month holds me accountable to plan those events!
  • Weekly Planning Forms. Obviously, these forms make up the bulk of the planner, and they’re definitely the most used. Each day offers a good amount of space, with options to write-in your own subjects. I love having the “Weekly Priorities” section on the side, where I typically write down components of therapy we need to focus on for the week. This sidebar would be a great place to write out a weekly or monthly memory verse, too.

If it were available, one thing I’d like to see in this planner is a “preschool planning form” organized specifically for preschool. Not all families would find this form useful, but many might enjoy it. Since we’re just in the preschool stages now, I modified the row labels to fit our needs.

A review and giveaway of the Well-Planned Day planner

Another “plus” would be a way to save all these plans and records digitally. HEDUA is currently working on a new digital option! You can sign up here to receive notice of when the digital Well Planned Day software is available.

HEDUA is currently holding a 30% off sale on all planner bundles. Check out their offerings here.

 

To see how someone with older kids uses The Well-Planned Day planner, check out this article.

This article on HEDUA’s blog shares 10 tips on using this planner, including some aspects you might not initially realize.

HEDUA is kindly offering one planner to one of you! Enter through the Rafflecopter widget below.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Terms of giveaway: This giveaway is open to US residents only and will end at the end of the day (EDT) August 25, 2013. All entrants must be 18 years old or older. Enter through the Rafflecopter widget above. Incomplete entries will be deleted. Once a winner is selected, I will contact them via email. If the winner does not respond within 72 hours, I will select another winner.

What planner do you use for homeschool planning? What’s one component you NEED a planner to include? 

Disclosure: I received a free copy of this planner in exchange for my honest review. All opinions expressed are my own. Affiliate links are also present in this post. If you purchase HEDUA products from one of these links, I receive a small commission without affecting your cost. Thank you for supporting this site and my family!

This post is also linked up with The Homeschool Village’s Ultimate Homeschool Link-Up and Hearts for Home linkup.

Roots for the Journey by Yancy Not Nancy

Roots for the Journey {a music review}

(Disclosure: Affiliate links to the album are present in this post. See the bottom of the post for full disclosure. Thanks for supporting this site!)

We love music around here. And when that music is focused on Scripture, growth, and praise? Even better.

Though I’ve heard of her for a couple of years, I was (finally) recently introduced to Yancy’s (not Nancy) awesome music. At the 2:1 Conference last April, I received one of her albums, a rockin’ album called the Jesus Music Box full of guitar and fast beats. (Find out more here.)

Roots for the Journey by Yancy Not Nancy

Yancy just recently released a new album and app called Roots for the Journey. This album is gorgeous. A bit of a departure from her faster paced music, this album began as a project to create a record of lullabies for her son. Here, I’ll let Yancy explain some more (subscribers, you probably need to click over to the post to view the video):

Yancy has almost a sultry voice with a rich sound in any note she sings. Roots for the Journey shares slower songs with soothing melodies and features more piano and softer guitar sounds. The songs are easy to relax to as well as sing along with, and they still feature a little of Yancy’s unique flair. The best part? All the lyrics are Scripture-based.

Another huge added bonus? There’s an app!

Roots for the Journey app

Yep, an app! And, it’s a FREE app!

Honestly, there is much more in this app than I expected. The videos I’ve shared on this post are viewable from the app, and a few of the music videos are there, too (including for the songs Joy and Safe).

It’s a beautifully designed app, too, but don’t think the opening page is all that’s there! See the menus down in the black bar at the bottom?

Roots for the Journey app screenshot

When you click on the “Family Devos” tab, you can access supplemental materials for every single song on the album! For each song, Yancy includes:

  • lyrics (I love when artists makes their lyrics available),
  • the verses the song is based on,
  • a family devotion to read together (written by various contributors),
  • questions to spur discussion in your family,
  • an activity to accomplish as a family to put the Scripture into action (awesome) and/or help make these truths more real for your children (I love the idea for “His Eye is on the Sparrow”), and
  • sample prayers for both a child to say and a parent to pray related to the song. 

The “Articles for Parents” tab includes lengthier devotions for parents to read and reflect upon.

Again, all this is FREE in the app! It’s a fantastically useful resource for families. I’d say the activities are especially useful for ages 3 to 10, but this music and these devotions and activities are inspiring for all ages.

Yancy describes the app here (click over to view this video, too, lovely subscribers):

Download the Roots for the Journey app here for iOS and here for Android devices.

Yancy Not Nancy free shipping

I’m really not sure I can pick favorites off this album yet, but I’m currently listening to “His Eye is on the Sparrow” and “Our God Reigns” repeatedly. My young’uns are already enjoying the music, too.

To get your copy of the album, click here.

Another bonus: Yancy offers free shipping any time with the code “YANCYLOVESME” at checkout.

Want to learn a little more about Yancy? Check out this fun video:

Oh, and one more thing… Yancy (awesome as she is) is offering one copy of the Roots for the Journey album to one of you! Enter this giveaway through the Rafflecopter widget below. (Subscribers, please click over to the post to enter the giveaway.)

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Terms of Giveaway: This giveaway is open internationally (thanks, Yancy!) and will end at the end of the day June 30, 2013 (EDT). All entrants must be 18 years old or older. Enter through the Rafflecopter above. Incomplete entries will be deleted. Once a winner is selected, I will contact them via email. If the winner does not respond within 72 hours, I will select another winner.

Have you heard any of Yancy’s music? Have you check out the free Roots for the Journey app? What resources would you like to see in family music apps?

 Roots for the Journey helps

Disclosure: I received a copy of the album for free in exchange for my honest review. All opinions expressed are my own. Affiliate links are included in links to the album. If you click on one of those links and then purchase the album, I will receive a small commission at no extra cost to you. I only join affiliate programs of resources I love and believe to be helpful to others. Thank you for supporting this site!

5 Ways to Encourage Pretend Play {plus ideas for special needs} via Under God's Mighty Hand

5 Ways to Encourage Pretend Play {including ideas for special needs}

Give my son an educational toy, and he will explore it and come up with creative ways to manipulate and move it. But, ask him to pretend to be like something or move like another thing, and that’s a challenge.

Pretend play doesn’t come naturally to him, whether that’s because of his special needs or just because it’s him.

As many parents observe and professionals know, pretend play helps develop the whole child, as well as offer a fun aspect of childhood. Pretend play:

-boosts social skills,

-allows children to learn new skills or knowledge through kinesthetic movement,

-offers opportunity to practice speech,

-increases exposure to and understanding of varying emotions.

(Check out this interesting article from Psychology Today on pretend play and this article from Scholastic.)

If your child doesn’t initiate pretend play, what ways can we increase opportunities for pretend play?

5 Ways to Encourage Pretend Play {plus ideas for special needs} via Under God's Mighty Hand

5 Ways to Encourage Pretend Play

  1. Parallel pretend play – This strategy involves a good bit of modeling. Either I pretend first, and then ask my son to join me, or I offer opportunities for my son to follow another child’s pretend play. Even copying someone else’s pretend play helps build a bank of ideas for your child to utilize later.
  2. Pretend to be animals – Pretending to be animals seems to be a first motivator for many children. Many children with speech delays may make animal sounds early on in speech development. Add in some basic animal-like movements, and you can build a base for pretending.
  3. Pretend play everyday activities – My kids love to play in their pretend kitchen. My son is especially interested in copying what Momma and Daddy do lately. He wants to sweep the floor or even runs to his kitchen to “fix dinner” right before we sit down to eat. This kind of pretend play both practices real life skills and allows for creativity and exploration.
    5 Ways to Encourage Pretend Play {plus ideas for special needs} via Under God's Mighty Hand
  4. Pretend play following a favorite show or movie – My son really responds to this kind of pretend play. When he watches a favorite character pretending to dance like a gorilla, he loves to jump up and dance that way, too. We also will watch a video, then act out the events of the show through gross motor pretend play or with manipulatives. When we watched the Olympics last year, I set up an activity to pretend with right after viewing events like the hurdles.
    5 Ways to Encourage Pretend Play {plus ideas for special needs} via Under God's Mighty Hand
    Recently, we watched the move Jericho: The Promise Fulfilled by Shatterpoint Entertainment. (Disclaimer: I received a free copy of this video in exchange for my honest review. See full disclosure at the end of the post.) This video is one big instance of pretend play! Jericho acts out the basic scenes of Joshua 2-6 and the battle at Jericho using lego* building bricks. This 28-minute stop-action movie uses corny and fun humor to provide entertainment while sharing the Jericho story. The sets they constructed for this movie are rather impressive and very aesthetically pleasing. The story itself follows the basic actions within the Bible, using some verses as lines and some improvised, modern conversation.

    5 Ways to Encourage Pretend Play {plus ideas for special needs} via Under God's Mighty Hand

    One of the sets in the Jericho film

    My son especially got “into” the movie when I grabbed his children’s bibles and flipped to the pages about Jericho. We paused the movie, read a few lines, then watched that part of the story in the movie. After watching the video, we made our own (very simple) Jericho and pretended marching and climbing the walls (see top photo). (Using multiple contexts seems to capture his attention.) He cracked up at the blooper reel in the bonus features. Shatterpoint Entertainment is a family operated business and the kids actually began creating these stop-action movies as a homeschool project! Parents will find the story behind the movies (shared in the bonus features) fascinating. Find out more about Jericho: The Promise Fulfilled and watch a trailer at their website here!

  5. Repeat, repeat, repeat – Since pretend play is challenging for my son, I have to remember he might not pick it up after just one exposure. The more we incorporate small instances of pretend play in our day, the more frequently he attempts it on his own.

My son has finally begun to initiate pretend play, though he usually still joins in or follows modeled behavior first. Seeing his creativity surface makes me excited!

How do you foster pretend play with your preschoolers and special needs children? Share your ideas in the comments!

*Note: Lego is a trademark of the LEGO Group, which does not sponsor, support, nor endorse this film.

Disclosure: I received a free copy of the Jericho film in exchange for my honest review. All opinions expressed are my own.

This post is also linked up with The Homeschool Village’s Ultimate Homeschool Link-UpHomeschool Creation’s Preschool and Kindergarten Corner, In Lieu of Preschool’s Tuesday Tots, UpsideDown Homeschooling’s Hearts for Home linkup, and the Weekly Kids Co-op at B-Inspired Mama.

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